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CHAPTER VII

its safe and successful operation, they will not withhold their proportional assistance."

[The person to whom this letter was addressed, was a clergyman of high standing and great influence in the Dutch Church, and his name deserves a place in the roll of the most useful and most honoured of her departed worthies.

The following brief account of him is taken from the Christian's Magazine. "Dr. Hardenburgh was an American. Although he had not been favoured with the same advantages in the early part of his education, which some of his contemporaries enjoyed, yet, with a powerful mind, and habits of persevering application, he made such progress in knowledge, that he was justly esteemed a great divine. He was ordained by the Coetus, and was the most distinguished and able supporter of that party. His piety was ardent; his labours indefatigable; and his ministry greatly blessed. He was the first president of Queen's College, and died in that office at Brunswick, in 1792, universally lamented."]

The second of these letters is dated March 23d, 1790.

"Dear Madam,
*********I thank you for writing, and most sincerely sympathize with you, and your whole neighbourhood, in the want of the public ordinances of divine worship. The vacant congregations are so numerous, that, as fast as we send out new candidates, they are immediately

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CHAPTER VII

called, and I know not of any resource sufficient, immediately to supply the places which are destitute. It is expected there will be three or four students who will come forward next fall, but these will be very inadequate to the demands of the churches. I know of no remedy for the present, but that the respective classes must pay more attention to the vacancies within their district, and by a punctual rotation of duty, supply such places with frequent service."

"The Methodists, who you mention as indefatigable in promoting their opinions, appear to be indeed very zealous. I am but little acquainted with them: I know none of their preachers, and can only judge of their doctrines from a few of their books which I have seen. I hope, in charity, that men who so industriously strive to warn sinners of the evil of their ways, have the glory of God in view; and I most sincerely wish they may be the means of alarming many stupid and wicked characters, with which our country abounds. Great allowances ought undoubtedly to be made for persons who are not within the means of proper information, and who are strongly prejudiced against certain words and phrases, which, however scriptural and true, appear to them to convey an improper idea. Under such impressions they may be strongly






        
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